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Which Knitting Stitches are Best for Marshmallow DK?

By Hannah Thiessen on October 18, 2021

It’s always amazing to me when I meet a knitter who doesn’t like to swatch–swatching is sometimes my favorite part of the entire knitting process! Setting aside time to swatch gives you a moment to get to know your new yarn intimately. For dyers, swatching is one of the many ways to determine how a yarn will behave and whether it’s right for your customers.

I know swatching takes a little time, so I’ve done some of the work for you! I’m spending some time with a different Knomad yarn each month to swatch stitches (simple and complex), get a feel for the spin on each base, and help you decipher what to choose for your next project.

First Impressions

Marshmallow DK is clearly designed to be soft, and take color well–it’s a workhorse superwash yarn that forms the core of many dyers’ offerings. It’s slightly softly plied, so when playing with this DK weight, I actually worked on a larger than normal needle to let the yarn breathe. This is a good thing if your customer is budget conscious–your DK can double as a light worsted for projects that need a little drape (and a lot of yardage).

When I make swatches, I do need to frog and re-start a few times, and noticed that Marshmallow DK gets a little bit fuzzy when doing so–this tells me the yarn will form a surface halo in wear, so it’s probably a better choice for accessory items than garments.

undyed knomad yarn

How to Knit Double Seed Stitch

Double Seed Stitch, also called Elongated Seed Stitch or sometimes Single Moss Stitch, features only knits and purls and creates a wonderfully bouncy fabric. It’s one of my favorite stitches. My swatch is worked on US 7 (4.5 mm) wooden needles.

undyed yarn marshmallow

This stitch swatch is worked flat
CO any multiple of 2 sts.
Row 1 (RS): k1, p1 across.
Row 2 and all WS rows: purl or knit the stitches as they present to you (knit the knit, purl the purl).
Row 3: p1, k1 across.
Row 4: as row 2.
Repeat these 4 rows to form this alternating ‘checkerboard’ style stitch.

Marshmallow DK knomad

How to Knit Twisted Stockinette Stitch

If you taught yourself to knit from videos or a book, it’s entirely possible you learned Twisted Stockinette Stitch by accident! This stitch is formed by working into the back loop of each stitch on the right side of the fabric, creating a ‘twisted’ stitch that slants slightly differently in every other row. Take the time to create beautiful, even Twisted Stockinette and you’ll fall in love with it, too! My swatch is worked on US 10.5 (6.5 mm) for a nice drape, but if you would like less transparency from your fabrics, you can also knit this on any gauge you like.

Marshmallow DK knomad
This stitch swatch is worked flat.
CO any number of sts.
Row 1 (RS): ktbl all sts.
Row 2 and all WS rows: purl all sts.

Marshmallow DK undyed

How to Knit 3 x 1 Slipped Rib Stitch

I love making hats, and this is a GREAT hat stitch. Knit at just the right gauge, it’s fully reversible, and the smooth side looks a lot like stockinette stitch unstretched. The ribbing here doesn’t add much in the way of shape, but it does highlight color transitions, speckles and variegated yarns in a way simple ribbing just can’t. My swatch is worked on US 10.5 (6.5 mm) to make the stitches super lofty and light.

Marshmallow DK yarn knomad

This stitch swatch is worked flat.
CO a multiple of 4 sts.
Row 1 (RS): *k1, p3* repeat until the end of the row.
Row 2 (WS): *k3, p1* repeat until the end of the row.
Row 3 (RS): *sl1, p3* repeat until the end of the row.
Repeat rows 2 & 3.

Marshmallow DK yarn undyed knomad

Here’s a list of great patterns to try for this yarn:

Musselburgh by Ysolda Teague – Knit
Olson by Julie Hoover – Knit
Facade by Shellie Anderson – Knit
Hatdana by Denise Bayron – Knit
Fall for Blues by Triin Kalbus – Knit
Twitterpation Cowl by Maryse Roudier – Crochet
Comme un Air de Printemps by Rachel Henri – Crochet
Falling Snow Mitts by Judith Brand – Crochet

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Hannah Thiessen

Hannah Thiessen is a passionate, self-proclaimed “wool obsessive”, who has worked in the yarn manufacturing, design, and production sector for the past decade. Through her books Slow Knitting (Abrams 2017) and Seasonal Slow Knitting (Abrams 2020), Hannah explores the relationship between the crafter and end project and seeks to provide a deeper, more holistic practice for fiber aficionados at all levels. On the Knomad blog, Hannah will be exploring natural dyeing on Knomad’s non-superwash bases, providing insight on the many natural dye products, extracts, and botanicals available to us, and expanding on the potential palette of color that surrounds us daily.

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